The men who went to war

The War Memorials inside and outside St Andrew’s Church on Torridon Road lists dozens of local men who gave their lives during the First World War. Kevin Loughnane has researched their backgrounds and provides moving details of the lives of those who walked out of the parish and never came back.

The War Memorial outside St Andrew’s Church on Sandhurst Road

Photograph: Kevin Loughnane

Astington, Tom
Kennedy, John Gilbert
Ayling, Leslie W Kennett, Percy W
Baxter, J Knapp, C J Ide
Bennett A E Lewis, L I M
Bicknell, A V Lonsdale, W
Bignell, Leonard Ludlow, B
Bowles, A E Moore, Sydney
Bradshaw, Charles Moore, W J
Bright, John A Moss, M
Brooks, Alfred Notton, George W
Bryce William Notton, Frederick W
Burrows, R H Nudds, A
Bussey, Harry M Osborne, Leslie
Chapman, C T Owen, A Trevor
Chapman, Charles S Panther, Cyril H
Collins, Geoffrey Parfitt, Frank E
Colson, T Parfitt, Herbert H
Cropley, Reginald F Parkinson, William
Cuming, Reginald Preston, D F
Daines, Roland Reynolds, Stanley W
Donaldson, H G Robertson, Harry F
Doughty, Charles E Robinson, L A
Dray, F Robinson, W A
Dyer, Herbert Sawell, Leslie
Dumbleton, Francis G Shearman, Hubert
Ebden, S C Smith, Robert
Ede, E W Snelling, George
Edgar, Ernest Sparkes, William
Edger, A Henry Strike, H Philip
Edmonds, Victor G Stringer, S F
Elliott, C C Tinning, D
Everett, Charlie Tringham, William G
Ewen, E C Wallington, Henry A V
Fleming, S D Watson, Stanley J
Fleming, H D West, George J
Foster, Frank West, George S
George, R A White, C R
Gibbs, W J Whittall, Noel C
Goddard, George Whittington, James W
Goddard, W E Williams, H C
Greenslade, Albert V Winter, Sidney
Hammerton, E Winter, Harold
Hammerston, F Wiseman, A J
Hardy, Percy Woodfine, A V
Harrison, G H Woodfine, L J
Hatcher, Albert G Woolmer, S H F
Hawkins, F A Woolston, Chas Fraser
Hawkins, G A Wright, B S
Hooper, J H Morris Wyles, Arthur G E
Isitt, Charles
Ives, Victor G
Judd, Frank

Astington, Tom
Second Lieutenant Thomas Jeffery Astington, 8th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment was killed on 28 February 1917, aged 21. He was the son of Thomas Herbert and Priscilla Astington of 71, Torridon Rd, Catford. Prior to the war he was employed as a bank clerk. He enlisted as a Private in the 28th Battalion (Artists Rifles), London Regiment but was commissioned in to the East Surrey Regiment on 19 December 1916, arriving in France on 20 January 1917. He was initially reported as “missing”, but was later confirmed as having been killed in action.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Ayling, Leslie W.
Private Leslie Wallace Ayling, 23rd (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment was killed on 7th December 1917, aged 24. He was the son of William Wallace and Rose Ayling of 31 Minard Rd, Catford, and brother of Cecil Wallace Ayling. He was the husband of Elizabeth Mary Ayling (formerly Rogers) of Spring Cottages, Lyoth Lane, Lindfield, Sussex. They married just after Leslie joined the army. He enlisted on 14 April 1915, initially being declared unfit for overseas service owing to defective vision (he wore glasses). However this was quickly overruled and he was declared “Fit for service at home or abroad”, and he arrived in France on 23 September 1916. On this same date he was appointed Acting Lance Corporal. At the time of his death he was a Lewis Gunner. The battalion diary shows that on the 6th, 7th and 8th December 1917 they suffered heavy enemy shelling resulting in six men being killed and 20 wounded. After his death his widow was awarded a pension of 20/5 a week for herself and one child. Another brother, Edward Wallace Ayling also served during the war, initially in the 1st Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment, and was then commissioned into the Royal Air Force. All three brothers were educated at the Roan School, Greenwich.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Baxter, J.
Rifleman Julian Baxter, 12th Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 15th April 1918, aged 20. He was born on the 23rd June 1898, the son of Alfred and Charlotte Baxter of 68 Arngask Road, Catford. He was educated at Holbeach Road School.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Bennett, A.E.
Ship’s Corporal 1st Class Albert Edward Bennett, HMS Hawke was killed on 15 October 1914, aged 36. He was born in Camberwell on 21 August 1878 and prior to enlisting in the Royal Navy he was employed as a clerk. He was the son of William Arthur and Hannah Mariah Bennett of 89 Minard Rd, Catford. He joined the Navy at Chatham on his 18th birthday, and served on numerous ships. He was drowned in the North Sea when his ship, HMS Hawke was sunk by a German submarine (U-9). He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

Bicknell, A.V.

Rifleman Arthur Victor Bicknell, 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade was killed on 10 March 1917, aged 29. He was the son of Richard Thomas Bicknell of Maybury Rd, Woking. He married Elizabeth Butlin in 1910 and they had one child, Phyllis Kathleen, who was born in April 1914. Prior to the outbreak of war, the Bicknells lived at 306 Sangley Road and Arthur worked as a butcher in the shop on Muirkirk Road. He volunteered to join the army on 12 December 1915, and was mobilised in May 1916. He then found himself posted to France in September of the same year. During his time in the army Arthur found himself hospitalised on a couple of occasions, once with influenza and once with trench foot. Following his death his sergeant wrote to his widow, Elizabeth, stating that Arthur had been shot through the head and died instantly. Elizabeth was awarded a pension of 18/6 per week for herself and their child Phyllis.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Bignell, Leonard
Rifleman Leonard William Bignell, 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade, died 10 February 1920 aged 29. The son of William and Frances Bignell, Husband of Maud Florence Bignell (formerly Lea). He was born at New Cross on the 14th January 1890 and was educated at Childeric Road School. Prior to the war, Leonard was a pastry cook and was living at 16 Killearn Road, Catford. He is buried in Lewisham (Hither Green) Cemetery.

Bowles, A.E.
Private Albert Edwin Bowles, 6th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) died of wounds on 23 September 1918, aged 20. He was the son of David Inskipp and Amelia Bowles of 4 Arngask Rd, Catford. Having been badly wounded in the legs he was on his way home from the front when he died on board a hospital ship. His brother arrived home from France just in time for the funeral. He is buried in Lewisham (Ladywell) Cemetery.

Bradshaw, Charles
Rifleman Charles Bradshaw, 21st (County of London) Battalion (1st Surrey Rifles) London Regiment. He died on the 13th April 1917, aged 34.He was the son of Henry Lee and Katharine Alice Bradshaw of Wakerley, Northants. Prior to the war he lived at 84 Arngask Road, Catford with two aunts – Mary and Sarah Dawson, and he was employed as a grocer’s assistant. He is buried in Bedford House Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium.

Bright, John A.
Serjeant Alfred John Bright, “B” Company, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment, was killed on the 6th July 1917, aged 35. He was the son of William and Jane Bright of Staplehurst, Kent and the husband of Emily Bright of 172 Verdant Lane, Catford.
John and Emily married in 1907. Prior to the war he was a schoolmaster at Hither Green School. He is buried in Bedford House Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium.

Brooks, Alfred
Private Alfred Brooks, 4th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment, died of wounds on the 23rd March 1918, aged 41. He was the son of Maria Brooks and the husband of Rose Brooks of 17 Glenfarg Road, Catford. Alfred and Rose married in 1914. Alfred was born in Catford and prior to the war he worked for the borough council as a sewer flusher.
He is buried in Bac-Du-Sud British Cemetery, Bailleulval, France.

Bryce, William

Rifleman William Bryce, 34 London Regiment, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, died of wounds on the 27
November 1918, aged 20. He was the son of William and Isabella Bryce of 113 Minard Road, Hither Green. He had attended Sandhurst Road School and St. Dunstan’s College where he had been a member of the cadet force. He joined the 3rd Battalion London Rifle Brigade in February 1917 and went to France in July the same year. He was severely wounded in the right leg during the 3rd Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele), and after convalescing he was transferred to the King’s Royal Rifle Corps. He returned with them to France in July 1918, and was involved in a lot of fighting on the Western Front. He was gassed on the 6th November and succumbed to its effects on the 27th.
On the 13th December 1918, The Catford Journal And Bellingham Weekly News published his obituary, stating “He was a bright lad, and took a healthy interest and participated in all kinds of athletics. He was an only son, and is deeply mourned by his family”. He is buried in Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, France.

Burrows, R.H.
Private Robert Henry Burrows, 11th (Lewisham) Battalion, Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment), was killed on the 7th October 1916. He was born in St. Pancras and enlisted in Lewisham. At 1.35pm on the 7th October 1916 the 11th Battalion Royal West Kents left their trenches to attack a German position known as The Gird Line, near the village of Le Barque. They were only able to advance 100/150 yards as they came under intense machine gun fire from three sides and took heavy casualties. Having started the day with 41 Officers and 737 Other Ranks, they lost 15 Officers (including the Medical Officer) and 323 Other Ranks.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Bussey, Harry M.


2 Lieutenant Harry Marslen Bussey, 3 Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, was killed on the 3 May 1917. He was born on 1st January 1894, the son of Charles and Helena Bussey and the grandson of the journalist Harry Findlater Bussey, who at one time was the sub editor of the Evening Standard. On enlisting in 1914 he gave his occupation as “Process Engraver”. He arrived in France in 1915 and he was wounded twice – at Armentieres in 1915, and again at the Somme in 1916. On the 21st July 1916 The Kentish Mercury published his photograph under the heading “Catford Sergeant
Wounded – Seriously wounded in June 1915, Sergeant Bussey who is the son of Mr Charles Bussey of 10 Ardfillan-road, Catford, was shot in the left arm, and wounded in the foot by shrapnel. He was educated at the Brownhill road Council School, Catford and was a well-known football player”. He was commissioned on 24th January 1917. On the 3rd May 1917 2nd Lieutenant Bussey was attached to the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, when they attacked the German lines during the Battle of Arras. The attack failed and Harry Bussey was killed, aged 23. He is buried in Brown’s Copse Cemetery, Roeux, France.

Chapman, C.T.
Unable to identify

Chapman, Charles S.

Private Charles Stirling Chapman, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment was killed on the 15th September 1916, aged 18. He was the third son of John and Louisa Chapman and prior to the war he worked at the Maypole Dairy, Catford. On the day that he died the 20th Londons were involved in an attack at High Wood on the Somme. Following his death his officer wrote “He died swiftly and without any pain or lingering……..He was a cheerful and willing worker and died bravely doing his duty”. On the 8th December 1916 The Kentish Mercury published his photograph under the heading “Catford Privates Killed – Private C S Chapman, London Regiment, Killed in action on September 15th, after being at the front for 14 months, had his home at 85 Sandhurst-road, Catford. He joined when only 16. He attended Sandhurst-road Council School”.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Collins, Geoffrey

Lieutenant William Geoffrey Collins, 7th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment, died on the 21st January 1918, aged 35. He was the eldest son of Mr W H C and Mrs H L Collins of 13 Coopers Lane, Grove Park, and the husband of Violet Colvina Collins (formerly Berry) of 223 Minard Road, Catford. They married in 1906 and had two children. He was educated at St. Dunstan’s College and was a keen tennis, cricket and football player. Prior to the war he was employed as an East India Merchant’s Clerk. He joined the army in 1915, initially in the City of London Yeomanry and then the Artist’s Rifles, before acting as Adjutant to the Lewisham Volunteers. He was then posted to the Norfolk Regiment and went to France in June 1917. He was wounded on the 30th November and taken prisoner. His leg was amputated and he died on 21st January 1918 in the Reserve Lazarette at Hamburg.
Following his death, officers from the Norfolk Regt wrote to his family –
“I can assure you the sad news came as a thunderbolt to many of us who count ourselves his friend. I am grieved beyond words. It is like losing a brother, and he is always in our thoughts”. He is buried in Hamburg Cemetery, Germany.

Colson, T.
Lance Corporal Thomas Colson, “B” Coy, 12th Battalion, Rifle Brigade, died of wounds on 23 November 1917, aged 26. He was born on the 5th January 1891, the son of Arthur and Mary Ann Colson of 9 Braidwood Road, Catford. He was educated at Rolls Road School in Southwark. Prior to the war he was employed by a gas company as a store keeper, and after joining the army he arrived in France on the 21st July 1915.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Cropley, Reginald F.
Private George Reginald Farr Cropley, 13th (County of London) Battalion (Princess Louise’s Kensington Battalion), London Regiment, died of wounds on the 15th October 1918, aged 24. He was the son of Samuel Farr Cropley and Jane Elizabeth Cropley of 215 Ardgowan Road, Catford. At the time of his death he had been posted to the 18th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps.
He is buried in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Cuming, Reginald

Driver Reginald Leslie Percival Cuming, 10th Battery, 4th London Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died on 23rd October 1915, aged 19. He was the son of Reginald and Rosina Cuming of 192 Minard Road, Hither Green. Reginald was a typist by profession, and volunteered to serve with the Territorial Forces in November 1913, being mobilised on the outbreak of war. In March 1915 he embarked at
Avonmouth to join the British Mediterranean Expeditionary Force and arrived in Egypt on the 6th April. On the 19th October he sailed from Alexandria on the transport ship HMT Marquette, as part of the 29th Division Ammunition Column, heading for Salonika in Greece; however on the morning of the 23rd the German U boat, U-35, fired a torpedo into her. The ship sank in approximately 13 minutes with heavy loss of life (167 in total). His parents received an official intimation that he was “missing and believed to be drowned”.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Mikra Memorial, Greece.

Daines, Roland
Second Lieutenant Roland Lewis Daines, 32nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers (City Of London Regiment), died on 3rd August 1917, aged 26. He was born on the 7th July 1891, the son of Thomas and Bertha Daines. He was born in Penge and prior to the war he was a Stock Exchange clerk. He enlisted in the army on the 9th September 1914 and first arrived in France with the 17th Battalion Royal Fusiliers on the 17th November 1915. He was then commissioned on the 25th April 1917 and returned to France with the 32nd Battalion. Shortly before he was killed he married Elizabeth Amy Benford who lived at 55 St. Mildred’s Road.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

Donaldson, H.G.

Second Lieutenant Herbert Graham Donaldson, 20 Battalion, London Regiment, attached Royal Flying Corps died on 16 February 1918, aged 25. He was the son of Robert and Lena Donaldson of 61 Broadfield Road, Catford. He enlisted into the 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment on the 7th September 1914 at Blackheath, enlisting with his brother, Leonard (Herbert being allocated regimental number 2881, and Leonard 2882). He arrived in France on the 9th March 1915 and took part in the battles of Loos, Vimy Ridge and the Somme. He progressed through the ranks and was commissioned in April 1917. He then joined the Royal Flying Corps as an observer. On 12 February 1918 the 51 Squadron aircraft in which he was flying crashed on take-off at Tydd St. Mary in Lincolnshire. The crash only stunned him but the petrol caught fire and he was badly burned. The pilot (2nd Lieutenant A.G. Taylor) received some injuries in trying to rescue him. Lieutenant Donaldson was taken to the 1st Eastern General Hospital in Cambridge where he died from his injuries.
He is buried in Brockley Cemetery, London.

Doughty, Charles E.

Private Charles Edgar Doughty, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment died of wounds on 24 July 1916, aged 25. He was the only son of Henry and Hannah Elizabeth Doughty, and he first arrived in France on the 9th March 1915. The war diary for the 20th Londons shows that on the 17th July 1916, 86 men “including three sections of bombers” attacked the German trenches near Souchez – one officer and 17 men were wounded. On the 11th August 1916 The Kentish Mercury published his photograph under the heading “An Only Son – The only son of Mr. And Mrs. H Doughty, of 39 Dowanhill-road, Catford, he has succumbed in the Boulogne Hospital to wounds received in a bombing Raid”. He is buried in the Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France.

Dray, F.
Gunner Frederick Walter Dray, 291st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, was killed on the 13th March 1917, aged 21. He was the son of Thomas and Alice Eliza Dray of 44 Arngask Road, Catford. He was born in Peckham and enlisted in Eltham.
He is buried in Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, France.

Dumbleton, Francis G.

Company Serjeant Major Francis George Dumbleton, 11th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers was aged 37 when he died of wounds on the 9th August 1916. Prior to the war he was a member of the Corps of Commissionaires. He had already served 19 years in the army and went through the siege of Ladysmith – he re-enlisted in August 1914. He arrived in France on the 25th August 1915 and just prior to his death he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal – the citation in the London Gazette was as follows: “For conspicuous gallantry during an attack, when, under exceptionally heavy fire, he collected and controlled a disorganised party of men, left without an officer, and, attaching himself to another battalion, took part in the attack and in the subsequent capture of prisoners”.
On the 8th September 1916 The Kentish Mercury published his photograph under the heading “Honour and Death – Dying on August 9th from wounds received on August 4th, he leaves a widow and child living at 180 Torridon-road, Catford. Only a month before his death he gained the D.C.M.”. He is buried in the Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt L’Abbe, France.

Dyer, Herbert

Driver Henry Herbert Dyer, “B” Battery, 261st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds on the 25th April 1917, aged 20. He was the eldest son of Henry and Ellen Dyer of 278 Brownhill Road, Catford. He was an old Torridon Road Schoolboy and a choirboy at St. Augustine’s, Grove Park. He had joined the R.F.A in August 1914 and went to France in October 1915. His officer wrote “His ever cheery face under the most trying conditions was an example to many, and I miss him very much”. He is buried in Achicourt Road Cemetery, Achicourt, France.

Ebden, S.C.

Private Sydney Charles Ebden, 10th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment died of wounds on 8th March 1917, aged 21. He was the son of George and Lily Ebden of 98 Sandhurst Road, Catford. He was born in East Dulwich and was educated at Sandhurst Road School. After leaving school he became a shop manager. He enlisted on the 9th September 1914 and arrived in France on 22 September 1915 – he then became part of the army in Salonika. After his death his platoon officer wrote “His death was practically instantaneous, though everything possible was done by the medical officer. His loss was caused by an enemy shell, in the afternoon of the last day we were in the front line. His loss is keenly felt by all in the platoon, and not least by myself, his platoon officer, as he was a good soldier, and set a good example by his courage and cheerfulness”.
His Brother James Herman William Ebden Was killed on 4th April 1918 whilst serving with the Royal Field Artillery.
He is buried in Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece.

Driver James Herman William Ebden, “C” Bty, 136 Bde RFA.

He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Pozierres Memorial, France.

Ede, E.W.

Captain Edwin William Ede, 11th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), was killed in action on the 30th August 1918, aged 20. He was the only son of Cecil and Annie Ede of 94 Arngask Road, Catford. He was born in Brockley and was educated at St. Dunstan’s. He entered the army from an Officer Training College, and trained at Lichfield. He had been in France and Flanders for 18 months and had seen much service. He was awarded the Military Cross for distinguished conduct in the field – his citation reading “For Conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while commanding a company in attack. He showed great coolness and determination under very heavy fire, and got his Lewis gun into action to counter the enemy machine-guns”.
Following his death, his colonel, in a letter of sympathy and appreciation wrote “He fell gallantly leading his company forward in attack and was killed by a machine gun bullet at close range”. He is buried in the Guards’ Cemetery, Combles, France.

Edgar, Ernest
Rifleman Ernest Edgar, 1st/8th Battalion, London Regiment (Post Office Rifles), was killed on the
25 March 1918, aged 33. He was the son of Charles and Alice Ann Edgar of 174 Broadfield Road, Catford. He formerly served with 71 Royal Engineers (Territorial force) Army Postal Service, having worked for the Post Office prior to the war.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

Edger, A. Henry
Corporal Arthur Henry Edger, 9th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, Killed 25th April 1918. He was the son of James and Elizabeth Ann Edger of 33 Dowanhill Road, Catford.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France.

Edmonds, Victor G.

Lance Corporal Victor George Samuel Edmonds, “D” Company 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment, was killed in action on the 7th June 1917, aged 21. He was the eldest son of Giles and Amy Edmonds of 236 Wellmeadow Road, Catford. He was educated at Torridon Road School and Brownhill Road Central Commercial School. He had been on active service in France for 12 months. Following his death his Company SergeantMajor paid tribute to him, saying “He was a splendid lad, thorough in every respect, never failing in any task. His duties with me as company runner were arduous, trying, and risky, and he needed coolness and courage. He filled his post admirably”
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

Elliott, C.C.
Rifleman Cyril Charles Elliott, 6th (City of London) Battalion (Rifles), London Regiment, died of wounds on the 28th June 1915, aged 22. He was the son of William and Ada Elliott of 58 Birkhall Road, Catford. Prior to the war he was employed as a clerk for a chartered accountant.
He is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France.

Everett, Charlie
Second Lieutenant Charles Alfred Stanley Everett, 2nd/4th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment, died of wounds on 17 June 1917, aged 23. He was the son of Charles Joseph Everett of 116 Broadfield Road Catford. Prior to the war he had been a student for 12 months at Kelham College, Newark-on-Trent, preparatory to entering the church. He enlisted as a private in to the 7th Battalion, Nottingham and Derbyshire regiment in November 1915 and progressed through the ranks, obtaining the rank of sergeant before being commissioned into the Lincolnshire Regiment in February 1917. At 11pm on the night of the 16th June 2nd Lieut
Everett left the British trenches with a raiding party, the objective being the capture of German POWs. The raiding party got to within 50 yards of the enemy’s wire when they spotted a German battle patrol starting out. They ambushed the Germans and a pitched battle ensued, resulting in the Germans retreating leaving behind two prisoners. 2nd Lieut Everett was injured in the abdomen by gun shot and was received at a casualty clearing station in a hopeless condition, passing away two hours after admission. He had been in France for nine weeks.
He is buried in La Chapelette British and Indian Cemetery, Peronne, France.

Ewen, E.C.
Ordinary Seaman Ernest Cecil Ewen, HMS Aboukir, died on the 22nd September 1914 aged 19. He was the foster son of Alfred and May King of 237 Torridon Road, Catford. He was previously employed as a leather dresser (the same occupation as his foster father). On the Morning of 22nd September 1914, HMS Aboukir was on patrol with HMS Cressy and HMS Hogue when they were sighted by a German U boat (U-9). The submarine fired a single torpedo into the Aboukir and she started to sink. The other two ships, believing that the Aboukir had hit a mine, stopped and started to rescue survivors. The U boat then manoeuvred into position and torpedoed the Cressy and Hogue, sinking all three ships. In all 1459 men died in this incident. The following month U-9 sank HMS Hawke, the ship that Albert Edward Bennett (also named on this memorial) was serving on.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

Fleming, S.D. Believed to be Fleming, Samuel David
Born on the 9th December 1885 at Brighton, the son of Samuel Fleming of 164 Sandhurst Road, Catford, and brother of Harold Fleming listed below. He was educated at the Hither Green School and then went on to work for the railways as a porter. Unable to identify his military history.

Fleming, H.D. Believed to be Fleming, H O
Private Harold Osborne Fleming, 1st Battalion Prince Albert’s (Somerset Light Infantry), was killed in action on the 8th August 1916, aged 22. He was the son of Samuel Fleming of 164 Sandhurst Road, Catford, and brother to Samuel Fleming (listed above). He arrived in France in August 1914, and during his military service he was awarded the Military Medal.
He is buried in Essex Farm Cemetery, Belgium.


Foster, Frank

Private Frank Edward Foster was the only son of Richard Thomas and Alice Jane Foster. He was educated at the Brownhill-road Central Commercial School and then Clark’s College. Prior to the war he was a bank clerk at Parr’s Bank, Lombard Street, London. He was a member of Hither Green Congregational Church and was also a Sunday School teacher. He enlisted at Blackheath, joining the 20th Battalion, The London Regiment. He arrived in France on the 9th March 1915, and saw active service at Neuve Chapelle, Festubert, Givenchy and Loos. He was only 20 years old when he died of wounds on the 22nd May 1916. On July 7th 1916 The Kentish Mercury published his photograph with the heading “Fatally Wounded at Vimy – The only son of Mr. And Mrs. R T Foster, of 10 Birkhall-road, Hither Green, he died in France on May 22nd from wounds received at Vimy Ridge”.
He is buried at Bruay Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

George, R.A.

Private Robert Alfred George, 6th Battalion, Australian Infantry, Australian Imperial Forces, died on the 10th August 1918, aged 21. He was the son of Robert and Louisa George of 212 Ardgowan Road, Catford. He was educated at St.Dunstan’s College, Catford and the Borough Polytechnic. He had previously been wounded in 1916 at Pozieres, being hospitalized at York.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Villers Brettoneux Memorial, France.


Gibbs, W.J.

Ex-Naval Stoker William James Gibbs was the son of George and Jane Gibbs of 106 Sandhurst
Road, Catford. He was born on 11 July 1891 at Aldershot in Hampshire. He enlisted in the Royal Navy as a stoker in 1909, and served on numerous ships, including HMS Victory. He was hospitalised in 1915 due to having Pulmonary Tuberculosis and was invalided out of the navy. He died aged 25, on 19th April 1917 from Consumption at his mother’s home on Sandhurst Road (his father, a railway guard, had been killed two years earlier in an accident at Northfleet). His funeral was conducted at St. Andrew’s Church by the Vicar, the Reverend E.C.B. Philpott, and he was buried with full military honours. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs Francis Chappell and Sons of Rushey Green. He is buried in Lewisham (Hither Green) Cemetery.

Goddard, George
Private George Goddard, 7th Battalion (City of London) London Regiment, was killed in action on the 25th April 1917, aged 39. He was the son of Robert Goddard and the husband of Ethel Annie Goddard of 163 Engleheart Road, Catford. George and Ethel married in 1899 and prior to the war he was employed in a bank as a porter. He is buried in Chester Farm Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium.

Goddard, W.E.
Gunner William Edward Goddard, 5th “C” Reserve Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds on the 29th August 1917, aged 29. He was the son of Frederick and Mary Goddard of 128 Sandhurst Road, Catford. Prior to the war he worked for the LCC tramways at the New Cross depot. He joined the army in November 1915 and went to the Front after four months training. His thigh was very badly fractured while in action and he underwent an operation in France and a further two operations in the Westminster Military Hospital. In the last operation his leg was amputated in the hope of saving his life. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs Francis Chappell and Sons and he was buried with military honours.
He is buried in Lewisham (Ladywell) Cemetery.

Greenslade, Albert V.

Gunner Albert Victor Greenslade, 146th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery was killed on 31 July 1917, aged 21. He was the third son of Edward and Henrietta Greenslade of 45
Ardoch Road, Catford. Prior to the war he was a salesman. He enlisted in the army on the 5th
June 1916 at Lewisham, and after training he embarked to join the British Expeditionary Force in France (on 26th September 1916). He was initially posted to 110 Heavy Battery, R.G.A., and whilst with them he was hospitalised on two occasions. He also found himself in a bit of trouble when he was five minutes late on parade – for this offence he lost a day’s pay. He was posted to 146 Heavy Battery on the 19th June 1917, and he was killed six weeks later while on his gun, by a shell. After his death the army returned his private property to his father – they returned a cigarette case, a wallet, a diary, some letters and some photos. They promised to pay the 10 francs he had in his possession in to his account. He is buried in Voormezeele Enclosures Number 1 and Number 2, Ieper, Belgium.

Hammerton, E.
Unable to identify.

Hammerston, F.
Able Seaman Frederick Hamerston, Howe Battalion Royal Naval Division, was killed in action on the 26th October 1917, aged 22. He was the only son of Frederick and Mary Hamerston of 35 Ardfillan Road, Catford. He was educated at the Plassy Road and Brownhill Road schools and he joined the 2/1st Lancashire Hussars in November 1916, transferring to the R.N.D. in June 1917. Prior to the war he was employed in the accountants office, Underground Railways Company, Electric House, Westminster.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Hardy, Percy

Private Stewart Percy Hardy, 2nd/20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment, died of wounds on 27 September 1915, aged 19. He was the eldest son of Frederick and Annie Hardy of 57 Hafton Road, Catford. He was educated at the Plassy Road Council School and prior to the war he worked for Messrs H.B. Legg and Co. of Canon Street. He arrived in France on the 19th August 1915, and died five weeks later. He is buried in the Noux-Les-Mines Communal Cemetery, France.

Harrison, G.H.
Private George Henry Harrison, 15th (County of London) battalion, (P.W.O. Civil Service Rifles),
London Regiment, was killed in action on the 22 May 1916, aged 21. He was born in
Manchester, the son of George and Louisa Harrison of 214 Ardgowan Road, Catford. The 15th Londons suffered intense enemy fire during the German attack at Vimy Ridge and on the day that Pte Harrison was killed their casualties were listed as: two officers wounded/missing, eight other ranks missing, nine killed and 73 wounded.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

Hatcher, Albert G.
Rifleman Albert George Hatcher, 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen’s Westminster Rifles), London Regiment, died of wounds on the 18th September 1915, aged 21. He was the son of John and Mary Hatcher of 95 Minard Road, Catford. Prior to joining the army he was employed as a clerk. He first arrived in France on 1st November 1914. He is buried in Hospital Farm Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium.

Hawkins, F.A.

Private Frederick Albert Hawkins, 11th Battalion, Prince Albert’s (Somerset Light Infantry), was killed in action on the 23rd October 1918, aged 18. He was the son of James and Mary Ann Hawkins of 92 Sandhurst Road, Catford. He was educated at the Sandhurst Road School, and prior to joining the army, he was employed in the printing works of the Catford Journal and Bellingham Weekly News. Frederick Hawkins was on his way to the front, and had not been in the trenches when he was killed. His chaplain wrote “It occurred on Tuesday night, October 22. We had just been moving up, and a number of the troops had been billeted in the barn of a farm. There were 19 of them. A shell came and killed 9, wounded nine, and only one escaped”.
He is buried in Tournai Communal Cemetery Allied Extension, Belgium.

Hawkins, G.A.

Rifleman George Alexander Hawkins, 20th Battalion, King’s Royal Corps, was killed in action on the 18th June 1917, aged 20. He was the son of James and Mary Ann Hawkins of 92 Sandhurst Road, Catford and brother to Frederick Albert Hawkins (listed above). He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

Hooper, J.H. Morris
Second Lieutenant John Hamilton Morris Hooper, 16th (County of London) Battalion, (Queen’s Westminster Rifles) London Regiment, was killed in action on the 30th November 1917, aged 26. He was the son of George William Giffard and Felinda Hooper. He enlisted in to the London Regiment as a private, and first arrived in France on the 24th January 1915. He was then commissioned in December 1916. He is buried in Moeuvres Communal cemetery Extension, France.

Isitt, Charles
Rifleman Charles Isitt, 10th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own), was killed in action on the 22nd November 1917 aged 26. He was the son of George William Isitt of 160 Glenfarg Road Catford, and was born in Walworth. He enlisted in Kennington under the assumed name of Charles Smith and was formerly with the 24th (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment. During his army service he was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Ives, Victor G. Believed to be Ives, Vincent G.
Rifleman Vincent George Ives, 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen’s Westminster Rifles) London Regiment, was killed in action on the 1st July 1916 aged 25. He was the son of Vincent and Emily Ives of 16 Ardgowan Road Catford, and prior to the war he was a stockbroker’s clerk. On the date of his death, Rifleman Ives’ battalion was part of the 56th (1st London) Division and was opposite the German positions at Gommecourt on the Somme. Their job had been to confuse the enemy as to the true location of the Somme advance, and in the words of the divisional historian “…unpleasant as it may seem, the role of the 56th Division was to induce the enemy to shoot at them with as many guns as could be gathered together”. By the end of the day the London battalions had lost 182 officers and 4,567 men killed, wounded and missing in action.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Judd, Frank
Second Lieutenant Frank King Judd, 5th Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 30th November 1917, aged 36. He was the son of Frank King and Sarah Judd of Wargrave, Berkshire and the husband of Margaret May Judd of 242 Verdant Lane, Catford. He and Margaret married in December 1905 and they had two children. Prior to the war he was a commercial traveller. He enlisted into the Gordon Highlanders in July 1916 and was commissioned in June 1917 into the Royal Berkshires. His name appeared on an official German list headed “List of Dead”:
“List of Dead.


R. Berks Regt. Identity disc was taken from fallen man, on battlefield at GONNELIEU and sent in by the pay office authorities of a Field Ambulance Coy 16.12.17”.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Kennedy, John Gilbert
Second Lieutenant John Gilbert Kennedy, 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment, was killed in action on the 14th September 1916 aged 29. He was the son of Ann Painter Christie (formerly Kennedy) of 336 Brownhill Road, Catford. His father was the late Alfred G Kennedy, a stock broker’s agent. Prior to the war he was employed as a bank clerk, the same occupation as his stepfather Alexander Christie. He enlisted as a private in the 28th Battalion, London Regiment on the 7th September 1914, and was allocated the regimental number 2509. He sailed from Southampton and arrived in France in February 1915. He was commissioned in November of the same year and posted to the Leicestershire Regiment. Also in this year he married Katharine MS Willoughby in Sevenoaks. On his death an identity disc marked “2509 Pte Kennedy J.G., 1/28th London Regt” was recovered from his body. His widow, Katharine, requested that all his personal effects be sent to his mother.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Kennett, Percy W.
Lance Corporal Percy William Kennett, 28th (County of London) Battalion (Artists Rifles) London Regiment, was killed in action on the 30th October 1917 aged 20. He was the son of William and Florence Kennett of 126 Wellmeadow Road, Catford. He was educated at St. Dunstan’s College, Catford where he joined the Officer Training Corps. His father was an accountant, and prior to the war Percy was on the staff at the Standard Bank of South Africa. He enlisted in November 1915 and arrived in France on the 5th March 1916. He was involved in the fighting at Passchendaele in 1917, and on the 30th October of that year he was reported as “Missing”, presumed to have been killed in action or to have died of wounds. His body was later found and was buried in March 1918. The grave, however, has since been lost. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Knapp, C.J. Ide
Private Charles James Ide Knapp, 7th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment, was killed in action on the 30th November 1917 aged 31. He was the son of Charles and Annie Knapp of 39 Hafton Road, Catford, and prior to the war he was a hatter’s assistant. He initially enlisted in to the London Regiment, but was transferred to the Suffolks.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Lewis, L.I.M. Believed to be Lewis J.A.M.
Gunner John Arthur Morgan Lewis, 120th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, died of wounds on the 29th October 1917 aged 36. He was the son of John and Kate Lewis of 36 Hafton Road, Catford. His brother Llewellyn also served with the Royal Artillery, but was discharged to pension.
He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Lonsdale, W.
Private William Lonsdale, 13th Company, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry), died of wounds on the 9th April 1917, aged 21. He was the son of Samuel and Minnie Lonsdale of 52 Minard Road, Catford. He initially enlisted in the Nottingham and Derbyshire Regiment before transferring to the MGC. His brother, Samuel James Lonsdale also served during the war and was commissioned into the 1st Battalion London Regiment.
He is buried in the Quatre-Vents Military Cemetery, Estree-Cauchy, France.

Ludlow, B. Believed to be Ludlow, Bertie
Gunner Bertie Ludlow, “B” Battery, 95th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery was killed in action on the 14th October 1918 aged 25. Prior to the war he was resident in Ladywell and enlisted at Deptford. The 1911 census shows Bert Ludlow living at 10 Leahurst Road (Hither Green) with his parents Edwin and Elizabeth Ludlow, his grandmother Louisa Ludlow, and his siblings Maud and Ruby. His occupation was general labourer.
He is buried in Troisvilles Communal Cemetery, France.

Moore, Sydney
Private Sydney Alfred Moore, 3rd Battalion, East Kent Regiment (The Buffs), died on the 9th January 1916 aged 19. He was the son of James and Margaret Moore of 72 St. Fillans Road, Catford. He was the brother of William Joseph Moore, listed below. His death was the result of an accident during training – whilst handling a rifle the weapon discharged and inflicted a wound from which he died in Dover Hospital. His funeral was reported in the Catford Journal “The coffin was covered with a Union Jack and apart from floral tributes from many local sympathisers, there were three large wreaths from his colleagues in the East Kent Regiment. The Rev W.S. Grainger conducted the service, the funeral arrangements being carried out by Messrs F Chappell and Sons, Rushey Green”. An inquest returned a verdict of Death by Misadventure.
He is buried in Lewisham (Ladywell) Cemetery.

Moore, W.J.

Second Lieutenant William Joseph Moore, 2nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery was killed in action on the 21st March 1918 aged 32. He was the son of James and Margaret Moore of 72 St. Fillans Road, Catford, and the husband of Hilda Moore of 6 Victoria Avenue, Surbiton – they had one child. At the time of his death he had only been in France one week. He was the brother of Sydney Alfred Moore, listed above.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

Moss, M.
Rifleman Mark Moss, 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen’s Westminster Rifles), London Regiment was killed in action on the 18th September 1916 aged 22. He was the son of John and Frances Moss of 229 Minard Road, Catford. Prior to the war he had worked as a porter for the civil service. He enlisted in the army under the alias of Thomas John Markmoss and first arrived in France on the 2nd September 1915. He is buried in Delville Wood Cemetery, Longueval, France.

Notton, George W.

Driver George William Notton, “A” Battery, 48th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery died on 27
October 1918, aged 20. He was the son of George Frederick and Mary Ann Notton of 161 Minard Road, Catford and younger brother of Frederick Walter Notton, listed below. George was embodied in to the Royal Field Artillery in September 1914 and went to France in June 1916. However his father wrote to the army and informed them that George was under the age required for front line service and he was sent back to England that November, returning again to France in April 1917. He was granted a period of 14 days leave to the UK in August 1918. He returned to the front in September and on the 26th October he was wounded – gunshot wounds to both legs and to the right arm. On the following day he was “Admitted dead to 4 Can CCS”.
He is buried in Duisans British Cemetery, Etrun, France.

Notton, Frederick W.
Gunner Frederick Walter Notton, 261st Battery, 2nd London Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action on the 1st October 1916, aged 19. He was the eldest son of George Frederick and Mary Ann Notton of 161 Minard Road, Catford and brother of George William Notton, listed above. Prior to the war he was employed as a plumber’s mate – possibly to his father who was a plumber. He was embodied into the Royal Field Artillery in August 1914 and arrived in France in October 1915.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Nudds, A.

Lance Corporal Albert Victor Nudds, 1 Battalion, Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment), died of wounds on the 31st July 1916, aged 21. He was the son of Henry and Lydia Nudds of 58 Sandhurst Road, Catford and he enlisted in 1914 at Woolwich. He arrived in France on the 7th December the same year. At the time of his death, the 1st Btn RWK was involved in heavy fighting at High Wood during the Battle of The Somme. On the 29th September 1916 The Kentish Mercury published his photograph with the heading “ Catford Man Killed – LanceCorporal Albert Victor Nudds, Royal west Kent Regiment, eldest son of Mrs. L Nudds, of 58 Sandhurst-road, Catford, who died of a severe gun-shot wound on July 31st, was an old scholar of Hollydale-road School, Nunhead, aged 21. A brother is at the front”.
The brother referred to in the article was Walter Henry Nudds. He is buried in Corbie Communal Cemetery Extension.

Sapper Walter Henry Nudds

46th Broad Gauge Railway Operating Coy, RE. He also enlisted in to the Royal West Kents, aged 17, but was transferred to the Labour Corps after being wounded on the 26th September 1917. He was then transferred to the Royal Engineers and died on 30th October 1918, aged 20, from bronchial pneumonia.
He is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension.

Osborn, Leslie

Private Leslie Augustus Osborn, 12th (Ayr and Lanark Yeomanry) Battalion, Royal Scots
Fusiliers was killed in action on the 8th December 1917, aged 21. He was the eldest son of Augustus Henry and Sarah Jane Osborn of 13 Benin Street, Hither Green Lane. Prior to the war he lived at 63 Killearn Road, Catford and was employed as a telegraphist messenger. On enlisting in the army he joined the Northumberland Fusiliers but later transferred to the Royal Scots Fusiliers. On the day that he died, the 12th Royal Scots Fusiliers were part of the 74th Division that bore the brunt of the fighting in the final push against the Turks in Jerusalem. They had moved from their bivouacs at Beit Anan (approximately 8 miles north west of Jerusalem) and attacked Turkish positions. The weather that day was very poor, the hills being wrapped in rain clouds with no shelter for the troops. The battalion lost five men killed that day. On the 11th January 1918 the Catford Journal and Bellingham Weekly News published his death notice “OSBORN – Killed in action in Palestine on 8th December, 1917. Private Leslie Augustus Osborn, aged 21, eldest and dearly loved son of Mrs. S. Osborn, 13 Benin-street, Hither Green. Sadly missed by his Mother, Sister and Brothers”. He is buried in Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel.

Owen, A. Trevor
Lance Corporal Arthur Trevor Owen, 17th (County of London) Battalion (Poplar and Stepney Rifles), London Regiment, died on the 9th November 1918, aged 22. He was the son of Arthur and Bessie Owen (one of four children) of 27 Dowanhill Road, Hither Green. He initially enlisted in the 5th Battalion London Regiment but later transferred to the 17th Battalion. Prior to his death he had served in France, Salonika and Egypt. He is buried in Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, France.

Panther, Cyril H.

Telegraphist Cyril Hambly Panther, HMPMS Duchess of Montrose, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve was killed on 18 March 1917, aged 19. He was the son of William S and Mary Amy
Panther of 106 Braidwood Road, Catford. He was educated at Plassy Road in Catford and the
Roan School in Greenwich. Prior to enlisting in the navy he was employed as a clerk. HMPMS Duchess of Montrose was a paddle steamer that was commandeered by the admiralty at the start of the war and after initially being used as a troopship was converted into a minesweeper. On the morning of the 18th March 1917 she was operating off the coast of Dunkirk where she cleared five mines that had been laid by a German U Boat (UB-12). She struck one and sank in less than a minute with the loss of 12 of her crew.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

Parfitt, Frank E.
Private Frank Ernest Parfitt, 1st Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 2nd September 1918, aged 18. He was the son of Jesse Camilla and George Herbert Parfitt of 64 Dowanhill Road, Catford. He was educated at Hazelbank Road School and initially enlisted into the London Regiment before being transferred to the Royal Irish Fusiliers. His brother, John Herbert Parfitt, also enlisted into the London Regiment before being commissioned into the Royal Lancaster Regiment.
He is buried in Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Cemetery, Belgium.

Parfitt, Herbert H.
Lance Corporal Herbert Henry Parfitt, 9th Battalion, Essex Regiment, died of wounds on the
30th August 1918, aged 20. He was the son of Henry and Caroline Parfitt of 141 Ardgowan
Road, Catford. He was educated at Hazelbank Road School and initially enlisted into the 11th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment in July 1915, before transferring to the Essex Regiment. He is buried in Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport, France.

Parkinson, W.
Private William Parkinson, 2nd Battalion, The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment), was killed in action on the 16th May 1915, aged 38. He was the only son of the late George Parkinson and husband of Ellen Parkinson of 148 Sandhurst Road, Catford and the father of Ellen and William Parkinson. Prior to the war he was a self-employed shopkeeper. He was born in Gateshead, County Durham and enlisted in Deptford. He and Ellen were married in 1902 and the children were born in 1903 (Ellen) and 1904 (William).
He has no known grave and is commemorated on Le Touret Memorial, France.

Preston, D.F.
Private Douglas Frank Preston, 1st Battalion East Surrey Regiment, died of wounds on the 16th
September 1916, aged 28. He was the brother of Florence Huggins of 65 Broadfield Road, Catford. He was born in Rotherhithe and prior to the war he was a restaurant waiter. He enlisted on the 5th September 1914 at Westminster, joining a cavalry regiment, before transferring to the East Surreys and arrived in France on the 20th July 1915. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Reynolds, Stanley W.
Gunner Stanley William Reynolds, “C” Battery, 235th (London) Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action on the 2nd January 1917, aged 27. He was the husband of Caroline Reynolds of 47 Hazelbank Road, Catford and prior to the war he was a dairyman. He married Caroline (Simmons) at St. Andrews Church on the 21st August 1912 and they had two children – Leslie George William (1913) and Kenneth (1914). He enlisted into the army at Brixton on the 10th April 1916 and arrived in France on the 5th October the same year. Initially he was posted to the 49th Division Artillery but was very soon transferred to the 235th Brigade. Following his death his widow was awarded a pension of 22/11 per week for herself and the two children.
He is buried in Dickebusch New Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Robertson, Harry F.
Private Henry Fergus Robertson, “A” Company, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment, died of wounds (gunshot wound to the abdomen) on the 28th September 1915, aged 21. He was the son of Elizabeth Harriet Hooper (formerly Robertson) of 99 Broadfield Road, Catford and the late Henry James Robertson. He was born in Balham, educated at King’s College School. Prior to the war he was employed as a clerk at
Messrs Charles Davis and Co. stockbrokers of London Wall, and then at the Metropolitan Gas Company at their offices at East Greenwich. He enlisted in April 1915 and arrived at the front in August of the same year.
He is buried in Noeux-Les-Mines Communal Cemetery, France.
Robinson, L.A. Believed to be Robinson, Leonard Alfred

Serjeant Leonard Alfred Robinson

“A” Company, 12th (Service) Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment Prince of Wales’s Own), was killed in action on the 9th April 1917, aged 28. He was the third son of Joseph and Sophia Robinson of 167 Glenfarg Road, Catford and brother to William Henry Robinson, listed below. He had served in South Africa, Hong Kong and Singapore and was gassed and wounded at the second battle of Ypres. He is buried in Beaurains Road Cemetery, Beaurains, France.

Robinson, W.A. Believed to be Robinson, W.H – Brother of the above.

Gunner William Henry Robinson, 11th Brigade, Australian Field Artillery was killed in action on the 4th May 1917, aged 35. He was the eldest son of Joseph and Sophia Robinson of 167 Glenfarg Road, Catford and brother to Leonard Robinson, listed above. Following his death his major wrote to his family describing how he met his end, stating that a shell striking and exploding in the gun pit, instantaneously killing all in the pit. He went on to say “We miss your son very very much and the sad happening cast quite a gloom over the battery. Your son was most popular amongst his comrades owing to his good living habits, his cheerful disposition at all times, and he won the admiration of his officers for his conscientious methods, and untiring devotion to duty”.
He is buried in H.A.C. Cemetery, Ecoust-St. Main, France.


Sawell, Leslie

Serjeant Leslie Wyard Sawell, “B” Company, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment, was killed in action on the 15th September 1916, aged 18. He was the eldest son of William Henry and Margaret Hannah Sawell of 7 Minard Road, Catford and he was educated at Colfe’s School. He enlisted at Blackheath just before his 17th birthday and first arrived in France on the 9th March 1915. He was killed by a sniper’s bullet and following his death his captain wrote “We all feel his loss very acutely, as he was much liked by all ranks and was one of the best N.C.O.’s in my company. I had hoped that he would be coming home soon to take up his commission, which he well deserved”. A lieutenant wrote “He was a very good lad and gave great promise of becoming a very good officer. His death is doubly sad as he would shortly have gone to a cadet school for training before being commissioned…He has died for his country. He did his bit and did it well. Nobody could do more than he did”. His brother, William Guy Sawell, also served with the London Regiment (1st Battalion) during the First World War and survived.
He is buried in Serre Road Cemetery, France.

Shearman, Hubert
Corporal Hubert Warner Shearman, “D” Company, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment, was killed in action on the 1st October 1916, aged 24. He was born on the 5th October 1891, the son of James Richard and Mary Eliza Louisa Shearman of 66 Ardgowan Road, Catford. He was educated at Hither Green School along with his elder brother, Edwin. After leaving School he became a warehouseman working in a drapery warehouse. Prior to joining the army he was resident at his parents address paying a weekly rent of 4 shillings. He enlisted at Blackheath and first arrived in France on the 9th March 1915.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Smith, Robert
Believed to be Corporal Robert Smith, 16th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, killed in action on the 9th October 1917. Born in Manchester, resident in Catford.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Snelling G. Believed to be Snelling, George
Corporal George Joseph William Snelling, “C” Company, 1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died of wounds on the 25th September 1914, aged 26. He was the son of Joseph and Florence Kate Snelling of “Lesperance”, The Woodlands, Hither Green. He had enlisted in Canterbury and arrived in France on the 13th August 1914.
He is buried in Le Mans West Cemetery, France.
Sparkes, William
Private William Sparkes, 13th (County of London) Battalion (Princess Louise’s Kensington Battalion), London Regiment, was killed in action on the 8th October 1916, aged 20. He was the son of Charles William and Mary Jane Sparkes of 146 Ardgowan Road, Catford. He was born at Mile End and he enlisted at St. Swithin’s Lane.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Strike, H. Philip
Private Philip Henry Strike, 2nd/2nd Battalion, London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers), was killed in action on the 15th June 1917, aged 36. He was the son of Frances Elizabeth Strike of 157 Hazelbank Road and the late John Rule Strike. He was born in Islington and prior to the war his occupation was wholesale draper warehouseman. He had two brothers who also served in the army during the war – James Horace Strike who served with the 15th Battalion London Regiment and Alfred John Strike who served with the 13th Battalion London Regiment. Both brothers survived the war.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

Stringer S.F.
Private Stanley Frederick Stringer, Number 1 Company, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards was killed in action on the 28th September 1915, aged 18. He was the son of Frederick and Mary Eliza Ann Stringer of 86 Killearn Road, Catford. He was educated at Hither Green School and afterwards worked for four years at Messrs Abbott Bros on Springbank Road. He then worked in the butchery department of the Arsenal Co-Operative store in Rushey Green before enlisting in November 1914. He was initially reported as missing in action but his family later received notification that he had been killed at Vermelles, France. The following September the family placed a “In Memoriam” notice in The Lewisham Borough News: “Stringer – In proud and loving memory of Stanley F Stringer who nobly answered his country’s call on November 5 1914 and was called home from scenes of battle on September 28 1915 – From
Mum and Dad, Harold, Eddie and Daisy.”
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France.

Tinning, D.
Private David Tinning, 2nd Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 25th
September 1915, aged 35. He was the son of John and Ellen Tinning of 174 Sandhurst Road, Catford. He was born in Putney and educated at the LCC School on Sandhurst Road. After leaving school he worked for the Lewisham Borough Council as a dustman before enlisting in the army as a regular soldier. He arrived in France on the 5th November 1914. The first news of their son’s death was conveyed in a letter from a comrade who stated that he “was buried in a little cemetery made for our brave heroes”. His brothers, Alfred, James and Robert, also served during the war.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.


Tringham, William G.
Private William George Tringham, 1st/24th (County Of London) Battalion (The Queen’s), London Regiment, was killed in action on the 22nd August 1918, aged 39. He was the son of Alfred and Emily Tringham of Camberwell and the husband of Ellen Annie Tringham of 9
Fordel Road, Catford. Prior to the war he lived at addresses on Hither Green Lane and Springbank Road and was employed as a woollen manufacturer’s agent. He enlisted at
Camberwell, joining the 8th London Regiment before being transferred to The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment). At the time of his death he had been posted to the 1st/24th Battalion London Regiment.
He is buried in Bray Hill Cemetery, Bray-Sur-Somme, France.

Wallington, Henry A.V.
Private Henry Albert Victor Wallington, 1st/23rd (County Of London) Battalion, London Regiment, was killed in action on the 3rd December 1917, aged 22. He was the son of Joseph Henry and Edith Wallington of 301 Brownhill Road, Catford. He was born in Peckham and was educated at Hazelbank road School. Prior to the war he was employed as a clerk, but in December 1915 he enlisted in to the King’s Royal Rifle Corps at Finsbury Barracks. He was transferred to the London Regiment and arrived in France on the 16th June 1916. On the day that he was killed the battalion was to the left of Bourlon Wood and their casualties were one man killed and 12 wounded.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Watson, Stanley J.
Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Stanley John Watson, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers, died of wounds on the 28th November 1915, aged 25. He was born on the 3rd August 1890, the son of Andrew and Mary Ann Watson of 253 Malpas Road, Brockley and the brother of Henry Charles Watson of 134a Brownhill Road, Catford. He had previous military experience, having served with the London Scottish between 1908 and 1912. He is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery, France.

West, George J.
Guardsman George Jesse West, Number 1 Company, 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards, was killed in action on the 13th April 1918, aged 31. He was the husband of Eva Maud West of 216 Ardgowan Road, Catford. George and Eva were married in 1910 in Greenwich and they had two children, Francis Richard (born 1911) and Daphne Joan (born 1915). He was born in Bethnal Green and prior to the war George was employed as a shorthand writer at the London Chamber of Commerce. He was killed during the Battle Of Hazebrouck where the line to the east of the Nieppe Forrest was defended against overwhelming German forces. Following the battle Lord Haig praised “The troops engaged in this most gallant stand” and an Australian officer stated “The men of my company and battalion are full of admiration for the way in which the guards fought. The morale effect on our troops by their resistance was excellent”. After the war Eva Maud West and the two children moved to Braidwood Road where they remained until Eva’s death in 1947.
He is buried in Aval Wood Military Cemetery, Vieux-Berquin, France.


West, George S.
Rifleman George Stanley West, 3rd Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own), was killed in action on the 28th March 1918, aged 19. He was the son of Ernest James and Elizabeth West of 64 Torridon Road, Catford. His brother Ernest Thomas West also served during the war, being commissioned into the Royal Field Artillery.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Poziers Memorial, France.

White, C.R.

Lance Corporal Charles Robert White, 13th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment was killed in action on the 27th September 1917, aged 26. He was the son of Mr and Mrs C White of 223 Brownhill Road, Catford. He was born in Walworth and enlisted at Lewisham.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Whittall, Noel C.

Second Lieutenant Noel Charles Whittall, 7 Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City Of London Regiment), attached Royal Flying Corps, was killed in action on the 12th September 1917, aged 22. He was the eldest son of Frederick James and Catherine Mary Whittall of 11 Torridon Road, Hither Green. He was educated at Claremont House School and St Dunstan’s College before leaving at the age of 17 to work for Messrs Elliott Brothers Ltd, electrical engineers in Lewisham. He was commissioned into the army in June 1915 and went to France in July 1916, where he remained until he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in 1917. He returned to the front with the RFC on the 14th August 1917, joining 6 Squadron. On one occasion during an air fight he encountered four enemy aircraft and managed to down one machine and dispersed the remainder. Following his death his Squadron Commander wrote “He is one of the greatest losses that my squadron could have sustained. Although he had been with me such a short time I realised what an excellent fellow he was”. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Whittington, James W.

Rifleman James William Whittington, “A” Company, 12th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own), died of wounds on the 17th June 1916, aged 22. He was the only son of James and Elizabeth Whittington of 18 Killearn Road, Catford. He was born in Rotherhithe and enlisted in London. At the time of his death he was reported to have been at the front for 20 months. On the 22nd June 1917 his family placed the following In Memoriam notice in the Kentish Mercury “On June 17th 1916, Rifleman J. W. Whittington, aged 22, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Whittington, of 18 Killearn-road, Catford. He died defending his country and those
he loved. Beloved by all who knew him. Dad, Mum and sister Rosie” He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Williams, H. C.

Private Henry Charles Williams, 20 (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment was killed in action on the 21st March 1916, aged 18. He was the only son (he had sisters) of Henry Charles and Mary Ann Williams of 155 Killearn Road, Catford. He enlisted at Blackheath and arrived in France on the 9th March 1915. Following his death his officer wrote to his parents “It is with the deepest regret that I write to tell you of the death of your son, who was killed two days ago in the trenches by a rifle grenade. Death was instantaneous so that he suffered no pain at all. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him, for he was a hard worker and one who was always cheerful. He was buried that night by the chaplain in a little British cemetery which lies just behind the firing line, and a cross will be erected over the grave to give us a visible reminder of a valuable life lost. You have the small consolation that he died doing well the duty which so many at home still wish to shirk”. In March 1917 the following In Memoriam notice appeared in the Kentish Mercury “In loving memory of our only son and brother, Harry, of the London Regiment, killed in action, March 21st 1916 – Mum, Dad and Sisters. A year has passed. Oh how we miss him. Some may think the wound has healed. Yet they little know the sorrow That is within our hearts concealed”.
He is buried in Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez, France.

Winter, Sidney

Private Sidney Winter, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London
Regiment was killed in action on the 23rd March 1918, aged 20. He was the son of Henry and Annie Winter of 74 Sandhurst Road, Catford, and brother of Harold who is listed below. He was born in New Cross and enlisted at Blackheath, arriving in France on the 9th October 1915. Prior to his death he was wounded twice whilst at the front. At the time of his death his father was still serving overseas.
He is buried in Fins New British Cemetery, Sorel Le Grand, France.

Winter, Harold
Private Harold Reuben Winter, 1/4th (Hallamshire) (T.F.) Battalion, York And Lancaster Regiment, was killed in action on the 17th September 1918, aged 18. He was the son of Henry and Annie Winter of 74 Sandhurst Road, Catford, and brother of Sidney who is listed above. He was born in New Cross and prior to the war was resident in Catford, enlisting at Lewisham.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, France.

Wiseman, A.J.


Lance Corporal Archibald James Wiseman, 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards, died of wounds on the 13th April 1918, aged 22. He was the son of James and Harriet Wiseman of 33 Dowanhill Road, Hither Green. He was killed during the Battle Of Hazebrouck where the line to the east of the Nieppe Forrest was defended against overwhelming German forces. Following the battle Lord Haig praised “The troops engaged in this most gallant stand” and an Australian officer stated “The men of my company and battalion are full of admiration for the way in which the guards fought. The morale effect on our troops by their resistance was excellent”. His younger brother, Gunner James Wiseman, served with the Royal Field Artillery and died of pneumonia following gas poisoning. James was buried in Hither Green Cemetery with military honours.
He is buried in Aire Communal Cemetery, France.

Gunner James Wiseman, Royal Field Artillery. He is buried in Lewisham (Hither Green) Cemetery.


Woodfine, A.V.
Private Arthur Victor Woodfine, 1st/4th Battalion, London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers), was killed in action on the 12th May 1917, aged 19. He was the son of Charles George and Mary Ann Woodfine of 152 Sandhurst Road, Catford and the brother of Leonard James Woodfine listed below. He was educated at the Hither Green School.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

Woodfine, L.J.
Private Leonard James Woodfine, 7th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 17th December 1915, aged 22. He was the son of Charles George and Mary Ann Woodfine of 152 Sandhurst Road, Catford and the brother of Arthur Victor Woodfine listed above. He was born on the 20th June 1893 and was educated at the Hither Green School and after leaving school he worked as a shop assistant in a grocer’s. He is buried in Point 110 Old Military Cemetery, Fraicourt, France.

Woolmer, S.H.F.

Second Lieutenant Stanley Herbert France Woolmer, 17th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps was killed in action on the 3rd September 1916, aged 20. He was the eldest son of Joseph France and Annie Maude Woolmer of 136 Broadfield Road, Hither Green. He was educated at
St Dunstan’s College and prior to the war he was on the staff of the Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation. He enlisted in the Inns of Court O.T.C. in September 1915 and was commissioned into the KRRC on the 3rd June 1916, proceeding to the front on July 8th the same year. In the attack on Sunday September 3rd 1916 he was wounded in the leg but on finding that so many officers had fallen, insisted in pushing on. He was shot immediately in front of the enemy trenches. His Major wrote “Everyone loved him and he is a great loss to us. Officers such as he was are hard to find”. He also said “He died a hero at the head of his men”.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Woolston, Chas Fraser

Serjeant Charles Fraser Woolston, 6th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment), was killed in action on the 13th October 1915, aged 20. He was the son of Charles Walter and Elizabeth Darby Woolston of “Stanmore”, 314 Brownhill Road, Catford. His father was one of the choristers at St. Andrew’s Church. He was educated at Colfe’s and his father’s old School Dorchester Grammar and prior to the war he was a farm apprentice near Margate. He enlisted into the East Kent Regiment on the 14th August 1914 at Margate and progressed through the ranks, being promoted to Serjeant in May 1915. He arrived in France with the British Expeditionary Force on the 1st June 1915. Following his death his Lieutenant wrote “He was in charge of one of our machine guns in the front line and was working it with great courage and coolness, when he was killed and two of his men with him. In Sergeant Woolston I have lost a most valued N.C.O., one of whom I Knew I could trust to carry out any enterprise whatever its difficulties and dangers. I can only hope that the knowledge that he died a heroes’ death will alleviate to some extent the great sorrow you will have to bear”. His brother, Arthur, served with the Royal Naval Air Service (at Gallipoli) and the Royal Air Force. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France.

Wright, B.S.
Unable to identify

Wyles, Arthur G.E.
Rifleman Arthur George Edy Wyles, 15th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 27th March 1918, aged 20. He was the son of Arthur Chester and Fatima Abiah Wyles of 97 Torridon Road, Catford. He was born in Romford and enlisted at Camberwell. His father, Arthur, was a former soldier having served in South Africa between 1899 and 1900. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France.

Zoller, Herbert S.
Rifleman Herbert Sidney Zoller, 1st/21st Battalion, London Regiment (First Surrey Rifles), was killed in action on the 7th June 1917, aged 36. He was the son of George Joseph Franz and Hester Zoller, the husband of Flora Constance Gwendolyne Zoller of 34 Verdant Lane, Catford, and the father of Gwendolyne Nina Zoller. Herbert and Flora married in 1908 at Carmarthen and Gwendolyne was born in 1910 at Lewisham. Prior to the war Herbert was employed by the London County Council as a school master.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

Inside the church is another memorial which includes the following additional names:

photograph: Kevin Loughnane

Ayling, Cecil W Jenkins, L
Blackburn, A Meadway, C H E
Butler, H H Russell, W
Crane, Arthur Thomas Smith, William George
Fotheringham, P Thorp, O
Jenkins, H J Woodrooffe, A H

Ayling, Cecil W.
Private Cecil Wallace Ayling, 7th (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment was killed in action on the 7th June 1917, aged 19. He was the son of William Wallace and Rose Ayling of 31 Minard Rd, Catford, and the brother of Leslie Wallace Ayling. He enlisted on the 5th August 1914, aged 16 and arrived in France on the 18th March 1915. After 15 months he was wounded and sent home, returning to the Front in April 1917. On the 6th July 1917 the Kentish Mercury published notification of his death – “On 7th June in France, Pvte Cecil Wallace Ayling, London Regiment, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. William Wallace Ayling, jun, 31 Minard-road, Catford, SE6”. Another brother, Edward Wallace Ayling also served during the war, initially in the 1st Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment, and was then commissioned into the Royal Air Force. All three brothers were educated at the Roan School, Greenwich. He is buried in Voormezeele Enclosure Number 3, Belgium.

Blackburn, A.

Private Arthur Blackburn, 1st/2nd (City Of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers), London Regiment, was killed in action on the 1st July 1916, aged 23. He was the son of William and Helen Blackburn of 66 Fordel Road, Catford. At the time of his death he was posted to the
12th Battalion, London Regiment which was part of the 56th (1st London) Division. On the 1st July 1916 this division attacked the German lines at Gommecourt on the Somme, going over the top at 07:30. By the end of the day the London battalions had lost 182 officers and 4,567 men killed, wounded and missing.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval memorial, France.

Butler, H.H.
Lance Corporal Harold Hubert Butler, 3rd Company, Machine Gun Corps, died on the 13th November 1918, aged 33. He was the husband of Annie May Butler of 283 Torridon Road, Catford.
He is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
Crane, Arthur Thomas

Leading Telegraphist Arthur Thomas Crane

HM Submarine E5, died on the 24th February 1916, aged 23. He was born on the 10th July 1893, the son of Thomas Charles and Martha Annie Crane of 75 Minard Road, Catford. An old boy of the Hither Green School, he joined the Royal Navy in 1911, aged 15 ½ at Portsmouth. He served on numerous ships during his time in the navy, including submarines. He served at the Battle of Heligoland Bight, which was the first naval battle of the First World War, occurring on the 28th August 1914. He had a narrow escape in November 1915 when he was washed overboard from his vessel in a rough sea, but was lucky to be picked up. However, when he fell overboard from Submarine E5 on 24th February 1916, he appeared to disappear almost immediately. The captain of the vessel wrote “His loss is one that all his boatmates and officers feel from a personal as well as a service point of view. In case it can be of any use or comfort to you in your trouble, I am able to tell you that he came to a true sailor’s end in an entirely painless way. We were nearing home in a heavy sea, running very comfortably, when your son slipped and fell overboard from the bridge, striking the side of the boat as he fell. He was seen as he passed astern, and obviously unconscious, after which he sank and was not seen again in the hour and a half that we remained on the spot. Although I have only been his captain for a few weeks I had formed a very high opinion of his character and his abilities and can understand only too well what a loss such a son must be to his parents. Hoping that this may be the only sacrifice demanded of you in the country’s cause in this greatest of all wars…”. A Board of Enquiry found “Crane was drowned at sea on 24th Feb 16 through accidentally falling overboard from Sub E5 while in the execution of his duty. No blame attributable to anyone”. Submarine E5 went missing on the 7th March 1916 whilst on patrol, believed to have been mined – there were no survivors. He has no known Grave and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

Fotheringham, P.

Gunner Peter Herbert Fotheringham, “C” Battery, 282nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds on the 4th October 1916, aged 23. He was the eldest son of Peter and Margaret Fotheringham of 1 Minard Road, Catford. Prior to the war he worked for a newspaper as a publishing clerk, and after joining the army in December 1914, he arrived in France on the 5th October 1915. On the 5th October 1917 two In Memoriam notices were published in the Kentish Mercury – “In memory of Gunner P. H. Fotheringham (Pete), killed in action in France, 4th October 1916. He was one of the best and will always be remembered by his fellow Athlonians” and “In loving memory of dear old Pete who gave his life on the Somme October 4th 1916. Affectionately remembered by all at 91 Broadfield-road. Greater love hath no man than this”
He is buried in Carnoy Military Cemetery, France.

Jenkins, H. J.
Private Herbert Joyce Jenkins, “B” Company, 3rd/4th Battalion, Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) was killed in action on the 24th August 1917, aged 40. He was the son of John and Elizabeth Jenkins and the brother of Leonard (listed below), Lillian and Evelyn Jenkins of 24 Birkhall Road, Catford. Prior to the war he was employed as a stationer’s assistant. He initially enlisted into the 11th (Lewisham) Battalion of the Royal West Kent’s on the 11th December 1915 (before transferring to the 3rd/4th), naming his brother Leonard as his next of kin. However, in his will he stated that “In the event of my death I wish my brother Walter Wiltshire Jenkins of 97 Lansdowne Road Old Charlton Kent to have all of my personal property with the idea that he will divide it between my brothers & sisters at his own discretion. My violin I should like to go to my nephew Arthur or to his younger brother according to discretion my share of the Property 24 Birkhall Road to be sold at reasonable price & divided”. He is buried in Sunken Road Cemetery, Fampoux, France.

Jenkins, L.
Private Leonard Jenkins, “D” Company, 1st/23rd (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment, was killed in action on the 5th April 1918, aged 38. He was the son of John and Elizabeth Jenkins and the husband of Daisy Jenkins of 24 Birkhall Road, Catford. He was also the brother of Herbert (listed above), Lillian and Evelyn Jenkins of the same address. He and
Daisy married in 1909 in Medway, Kent and they had two children – Arthur (b. 1909) and
Leslie (b. 1915); prior to the war he was employed as a stationer’s clerk. He enlisted into the London Regiment on the 9th December 1915, but didn’t arrive in France until the 13th December 1917. He was reported as missing on the 5th April 1918 and initially the family received intimation that he had been taken as a prisoner of war. However it was confirmed later that he had been killed in action. The battalion diary states that on the morning of the 5th April 1918 they were at Aveluy Wood and that “D Coy, on left of front line attacked by overwhelming numbers and surrounded. Survivors state that the Coy met the enemy with rifles and Lewis guns but were unable to prevent him getting their rear”. By the end of the day the battalion strength was down to five officers and 150 other ranks. He is buried in Martinsart British Cemetery, France.

Meadway, C. H. E.

Stoker 1 Class Cecil Harold Ernest Meadway, HMS Arabis, was killed in action on the 11 February 1916, aged 23. He was born on the 5th August 1892, the son of Ernest George and Ellen Meadway of 181 Sandhurst Road, Catford. He was an old boy of Torridon-road LCC School and he joined the Royal Navy in 1911, serving on several ships including the Empress of India and the Hibernia. He was involved in the Battle of Dogger Bank on the 24th January 1915 when the German armoured cruiser SMS Blucher was sunk. He was also among the survivors from HMS Argyle, when that ship struck Bell Rock (off the Firth of Forth) in October 1915. On the night of the 10th/11th February 1916 HMS Arabis was engaged in minesweeping off Dogger Bank, when she was attacked by a German Flotilla. The Arabis was lost along with 56 of her crew. His brother, Herbert, who was two years younger also served in the Royal Navy.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

Russell, W.

Gunner William Henry Russell, “X” 39th Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action on the 29th September 1916, aged 18. He was the son of Thomas and Amy Russell of 157 Sandhurst Road, Catford. He was educated at the Sandhurst Road LCC School and joined the army soon after the war broke out. He was given his discharge but re-enlisted on the 9th February 1916. In a letter, his lieutenant wrote “His death was a great loss to his battery, as he was a good soldier, always performing his duty cheerfully and well, even under trying circumstances”.
He is buried in Hamel Military Cemetery, Beaumont Hamel, France.


Smith, William George
Unable to identify

Thorp, O.

Private James Frederick Oswald Thorp, 10th Battalion, The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) was killed in action on the 27th July 1918, aged 19. He was the son of Frederick and Kate Thorp of 130 Ardgowan Road, Catford. He was connected with the Torridon Road Congregational Church, being involved from the Infant’s up to the Boy’s Own classes. He also taught at the Toye’s Orphanage in Greenwich, where following his death, a dormitory was named in his honour. His death was reported in the Catford Journal and Bellingham Weekly News: “Private James Frederick Oswald Thorp, Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment who was killed instantly by a shell whilst on night duty in France on July 27, was the only surviving son of Mr. and Mrs. F Thorp, of 130 Ardgowan-road, Catford. He was only 19 years of age, and was born at East Brixton, and previous to joining the Colours was a clerk in the tea trade. It was on May 1 of 1917 that he joined the West Surreys, and trained at Aldershot, Colchester, and Cromer, going to France on April 1 of this year. The first intimation the parents had of their son’s death was by means of a letter received by Mrs. Child, of 92 George-lane, Catford, from her son in France who wrote on June(sic) 27: “I’m awfully down-hearted to-day. My chum Thorp (whose sister is in the Torridon-road Choir) was killed last night. We were a working party going wiring, when Jerry started sending 18-pounders over. One burst just behind me. Thorp, who was a few paces behind, was hit in the back of the head and killed instantly; another fellow in my own team was wounded in leg. Will you please ask dad to write a letter to his people on my behalf? I should hardly know how to set about it myself. I enclose a letter I found in his haversack” The chaplain, The Rev. E Sayer Ellis wrote to his sister ”Do all you can to be as brave-hearted in your grief as your brother was in danger…Your brother was well thought of by his officers and much liked by his comrades. You have much reason to be proud of him for the fine way he has given himself in life and in death”. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Woodrooffe, A. H.
Second Lieutenant Arthur Henry Woodrooffe, 10th Battalion, (Queen’s Own) Royal West Kent Regiment, was killed in action on the 31st July 1917, aged 26. He was born on the 29th March 1891, the son of Henry and Sarah Woodrooffe of 318 Brownhill Road, Catford. He was educated at the Bellenden Road School, East Dulwich and prior to the war he was employed as a tea buyer’s assistant. He had previous military experience having served with the 4th London Howitzer Brigade, Royal Field Artillery between 1909 and 1913. In January 1915 he enlisted into the Army Pay Corps and had attained the rank of Acting Sergeant by the time that he was accepted for a commission. On applying for a commission he stated his preference to be posted to an artillery regiment, but ended up being posted to the infantry (his third choice). The telegram sent to his father at Brownhill Road read “Regret to inform you 2lt A H Woodroffe Royal West Kent Regt reported missing August first. This does not necessarily mean he is either killed or wounded. Any further reports sent immediately received”. This was soon followed by a telegram reading “Regret to inform you 2lt A H Woodroffe Royal West Kent Regt previously reported missing August first is now reported killed in action July thirty first. The army council express their sympathy”. His service record is annotated “We have no record of this officer’s body having been recovered”.
He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

Compiled by Kevin Loughnane.

Information Sources:

Commonwealth War Graves Commission.
Local History and Archives Centre Lewisham.
The National Archives (RN, RAF & Army Officers’ Service Records, Battalion War Diaries). The Kentish Mercury (From the British Library Newspaper Collection & Lewisham Local History and Archive Centre).
Catford Journal and Bellingham Weekly News (From the Lewisham Local History and Archive Centre)
Ancestry.co.uk (For SDGW, Service Records, MICs, Roll of Honour of The Great War, DeRuvigney’s, Census Returns, Electoral Registers, London School Registers & BMDs).

With special thanks to:

Phillip Evans (Shared Research).
Andy Pepper (Notes).
Denise Pritchard, St Andrew’s Church (Shared Research).
John Goodwin (Former Church Warden at St. Andrew’s Church).
Great War Forum members.
Also to all those who supplied information of a personal/family nature for the men on the memorial.